Category Archives: resources

Pet care, other rescues, shelter information

Dog Boarding

rover_logoWhether you need in-home dog boarding, pet sitting, dog walking, or day care, Rover connects pet parents with people who’ll treat their dogs like family. Rover can help provide safe and proper care for your pets while you are away on a business trip or family vacation. Wherever you are, a Rover sitter can help.

Your New Dog

Please keep in mind that no matter what age or type of dog or puppy you adopt into your home, they all need and want ample play time, exercise, walks and toys to challenge them. Your personal interaction with your dog will ensure a loving and bonding relationship for a lifetime.

This document should be used as a general guide, keeping in mind that every situation will be different. In every circumstance, we ask that you be patient while your new dog adjusts to her new home.

If you have any questions or concerns at any time, please do not hesitate to contact us by phone or email.

Bringing Your New Dog Home

It’s a big world out there! Your new dog may have been at our kennel for weeks, months, or even years. In any case, your home is a new world and a LOT bigger than what he has been accustomed to. It can be overwhelming.

For this reason, we offer the following suggestions:

  • Before bringing your dog or puppy into your home: Take a good walk around the block with your new addition. This will create a calmer dog or puppy entering your home for the first time.
  • Ok, time for coming into the new home! Keep in mind how exciting this is for your new dog! Once you enter the home, keep your dog with you on a leash, so he can get familiar safely with the new home. At this time, be sure to show him where the food and water bowls will be, as well as the sleeping area.
  • Establish your routine on day 1. Our dogs are all kennel trained, not housebroken. You must put your dog on your schedule now. Never forget that dogs aim to please their humans – always praise your dog after going to the bathroom outside (or on his designated area if you are training a puppy.)
  • Use a kennel/crate (only for positive training) or a baby gate to confine your dog to one area. This will help him or her to adjust to the new surroundings.
  • When you leave your new dog alone for the first time, he may have some anxiety. For this reason, do NOT make a big deal over your leaving OR your returning home.
  • Above all, please be patient. It could take a couple of weeks, or even a month or more for your new dog or puppy to feel completely secure.

New Dog Supplies

  • Collar – We recommend the Martingale or no-slip collar. To check for a proper fit, it is CRITICAL that your dog’s head cannot slip through a too big collar. You can check if the collar is a comfortable fit by checking If two of your fingers can fit between your dog’s neck and the collar.
  • Leash – We recommend a 6-foot leash. We are not in favor of retractable leashes. It does not give you control.
  • Microchip – Every dog we adopt out is microchipped. Think of it as a permanent ID tag. For the microchip to be effective, you must add your contact information and keep the microchip updated if any of your information changes.
  • ID Tag – ASAP. Even though your dog is microchipped, he should ALWAYS have a tag with his name and your phone number.
  • Food and Water Bowls – Stainless steel, ceramic and glass are the best. Plastic holds in bacteria and are never recommended. Be sure to always have fresh water available.
  • Quality Food – When switching to a new food, be sure to gradually add the new food to the old to eliminate upset stomachs. We do not recommend supermarket food.
  • Dog Bed
  • Crate – Optional. Crates should only be used to represent a positive environment for your puppy or dog, never for punishment. This could be your best investment for housebreaking and getting used to a new home.
  • Toys – Have lots of rope toys and “kongs” to save your belongings.
  • Treats – Our dogs do not get treats on a regular basis, so reward with treats sparingly. We do not recommend rawhide bones or Greenies, as those can be fatal if it were to lodge in your dog’s throat.
  • Brush and Comb – In addition to being important for your dog or puppy’s coat, proper brushing and grooming should be a positive and bonding experience for you and your dog or puppy.
  • Nail Trimming – Even regular walks on pavement, your dog’s nails will require periodic trimming, averaging once every 4 to 6 weeks. You can do it yourself or take your dog to your vet’s office  or groomer for routine nail trimming.
  • Training – Since every dog and puppy is different, training will vary. One basic obedience class is always recommended. We would be happy to give you referrals if you should need one.
  • Flea Preventative – Fleas multiply rapidly and quickly and can spread from pet to pet; if you have any suspicion that your pet has fleas, contact your veterinarian immediately to determine the best treatment for your pet. Flea preventative is recommended on a case-by-case basis. We suggest using Comfortis (pill) or Frontline (topical).

    How to tell if your dog has fleas:

    • An unusual amount of scratching, biting and licking
    • Bumps on the skin (could mean an allergy to a flea bite)
    • Tiny droplets of blood in the food or water bowl
    • White worms near the dog’s anal area. Flea infestation is not only very uncomfortable for your pet, it can lead to him developing worms and other more serious issues if left untreated.

Quality Vet Care

  • Puppies require 3 rounds of shots (given at different stages).
  • Provided your dog shows no signs of ill health, annual check-ups should be sufficient.
  • If you don’t currently have a vet, make it a priority to find one that you trust.
  • Establish a relationship between you, your pet, and your vet while your pet is healthy; do not wait until your pet is sick and needs medical attention to find a quality vet.
  • Know the address of your closest 24-hour veterinary emergency hospital and keep their phone number handy.

Your New Cat

Now that you’ve decided on your cat, here are some tips on how you can make the transition a smooth one for your new cat and you!

Please keep in mind that no matter what age or type of cat you adopt into your home, they all need and want ample play time and toys to challenge them. Your personal interaction with your cat will ensure a loving and bonding relationship for a lifetime.

This document should be used as a general guide, keeping in mind that every situation will be different. In every circumstance, we ask that you be patient while your new cat adjusts to her new home.

If you have any questions or concerns at any time, please do not hesitate to contact us by phone or email.

Bringing Your New Cat Home

It’s a big world out there! Your new cat may have been at our kennel for a few months or even years, or only for a week or two. In any case, your home is a new world and a LOT bigger than what she has been accustomed to. It can be overwhelming.

For this reason, we offer the following suggestions:

  • Introduce your new cat to one room at a time.
  • Until your cat feels comfortable, you may want to confine her to one room.
  • Be with your cat as she explores the new surroundings; this will help her to not feel so frightened and to help set boundaries as to just where she can go.
  • Show your cat where the litter box will be kept and place her gently into it for a moment.
  • Show your cat where the food bowls will be (have fresh water and food in the bowls when you do this).
  • Avoid loud noises – this will most certainly frighten your cat any time, but especially when she is not yet comfortable in the new home.
  • Talk, talk, talk.. Your new cat will be soothed by your gentle voice.

If you have another cat in your home:

  • Keep your new cat in a separate room from your resident cat. Rub small towels against each of the cats, and leave each scented towel with the other cat.
  • Be sure to show ample (or even more) attention to your resident cat so she does not feel left out or resentful toward the new addition.
  • Have supervised and limited interaction between the resident cat and your new cat.
  • Depending on how the cats interact with each other, you may need to keep the separation period for as little as a few days or for as long as two weeks or more.
  • We all want our pets to be the best of friends. This is not the case in all situations, and sometimes the best scenario is that they will simply “tolerate” each other.
  • Above all – please BE PATIENT while everyone is going through the adjustment period.

New Cat Supplies

  • Litter pans – We suggest 1 litter pan per cat/kitten. Size is important. If you are bringing home a kitten, you will want to start with a small litter pan; increase the size of the litter pan as your kitten grows, depending on how big he or she gets. Your cat needs ample room to “scratch and dig” and to relieve himself or herself comfortably without eliminating over the sides of the litter pan. World’s Best Litter is a natural, non-toxic brand of litter and “clumps” very well. (Particularly recommended for kittens whose little lungs can be more sensitive to the dust of clay litter.) Another good clumping litter is Tidy Cat and can be found in most all supermarkets as well as pet stores. Note that not all cat litter is “flushable.”
  • Scoopers – Litter pan scoopers to “scoop” the waste from the litter pan. Scoop as needed, at minimum twice per day, more often for multiple-cat households. Litter pans should be emptied and thoroughly washed once or twice per week depending on usage and number of cats. Simple Green brand cleaner is non-toxic and biodegradable and can be diluted with hot water to wash out the litter pan.
  • Food and Water Bowls – Stainless steel, ceramic, or glass are best. Plastic bowls hold in bacteria, can cause feline acne, and are not recommended.
  • Quality Food – Wellness canned (most are grain-free) and dry food are a good example of quality food for a standard diet. Others can be found in pet stores such as Petco, Centinela Pet and Feed, or Pet Depots. Typically the staff at these stores are knowledgeable and helpful. If your pet has dietary restrictions, prescription diets can be found at your vet’s office.
  • FRESH Water – Water (NOT milk) is vital to cats’ well-being. Always have fresh water available. Consider using filtered water.
  • Wire Brush and Comb – Cats and kittens love to be brushed and combed. If they are frightened at first, slowly introduce brushing into their daily routine. Even if this means only one stroke. Once your cat is comfortable with you and knows that the brush and comb are good things, this routine will provide wonderful bonding time for both of you as well as promote a healthy, shiny coat, and reduce dander, shedding, and hairballs. Regular brushing is critical if you have a long- or medium-haired cat. Without regular brushing, knots or mats can form close to the skin and be extremely painful to your pet. If the knots or mats cannot be combed out, the pet will need to be shaved.
  • Hairball Remedies – Since cats and kittens are fastidious groomers, they can ingest a lot of hair, even with regular brushing. A good, natural remedy to help them eliminate hairballs is “kitty grass”. You can find “kitty grass” at most supermarkets and just about every pet store. Another alternative is Petromalt, an intestinal lubricant that comes in a tasty paste and aids in hairball prevention and elimination. A veterinarian may give specific directions regarding Petromalt dosage. Follow your veterinarian’s advice closely. Hairballs are generally more common in adult cats than young kittens.
  • Scratching Posts – Let’s face it, cats and kittens love to scratch; it is a healthy and a natural instinct for them. Declawing your cat  is NOT an option. It is inhumane, as well as a violation of your contract with us. Having a couple of durable, sturdy scratching posts will not only make your cat or kitten very happy, it can also help to deter unwanted scratching on your furniture. Be sure to show your new cat the scratching posts. Gently put her front paws on the scratching post and be sure to praise her for using it.
  • Kitty Perches and Condos – Some cats and kittens love a bird’s eye view to survey their surroundings. Be sure it is sturdy and will not tip over if your cat jumps on or off the perch.
  • Toys, Toys and TOYS – Cats and kittens love to play with toys. Little catnip mice or glitter balls are great to toss around for them to chase and pounce. Feather poles are another fun and interactive way for you and your cat to engage in play time. This is also very stimulating for your cat. Be careful of small toys or toys with loose parts that your pet can accidentally ingest.
  • Catnip – A sprinkle of fresh catnip every now and then is always a fun treat for kitty.
  • Nail Trimming – Even with ample scratching on a scratching post, your cat’s nails will require periodic trimming, averaging once every 4 to 6 weeks.  You can do it yourself or take your dog to your vet’s office  or groomer for routine nail trimming.
  • Flea Preventative – Fleas multiply rapidly and quickly and can spread from pet to pet; if you have any suspicion that your pet has fleas, contact your veterinarian immediately to determine the best treatment for your pet. Flea preventative is recommended on a case-by-case basis. We suggest using Comfortis (pill) or Frontline (topical). Please make sure whatever product you use is safe for cats. Some dog-specific flea preventatives are extremely toxic to cats.

    Reasons to use a flea control product can be:

    • if you have a dog. Since dogs go outside regularly, there is a likely chance that your dog could be exposed to fleas.
    • if you work or play outside or in a garden. Fleas can be brought in on your own shoes or clothes.
    • if you like to walk on the beach. The beach can harbor sand fleas.
    • if you care for a colony of feral cats. (May we add a special thank you if you do this!)

    How to tell if your cat has fleas:

    • An unusual amount of scratching, biting and licking
    • Bumps on the skin (could mean an allergy to a flea bite)
    • Tiny droplets of blood in the food or water bowl
    • White worms near the cat’s anal area. Flea infestation is not only very uncomfortable for your pet, it can lead to her developing worms and other more serious issues if left untreated.

Quality Vet Care

  • All of the kittens and cats that come into our kennel are tested for the FELV (Feline Leukemia Virus) and the FIV (Feline Immunodeficiency Virus).
  • Kittens require 3 rounds of shots (given at different stages).
  • Provided your cat shows no signs of ill health, annual check-ups should be sufficient.
  • If you don’t currently have a vet, make it a priority to find one that you trust.
  • Establish a relationship between you, your pet, and your vet while your pet is healthy; do not wait until your pet is sick and needs medical attention to find a quality vet.
  • Know the address of your closest 24-hour veterinary emergency hospital and keep their phone number handy.

FIV+ Cats

It is estimated that about 3% of seemingly healthy cats are actually positive for FIV. Most cats are not tested before they are adopted and most owners have no reason to suspect their cat has this virus. Many, many healthy cats have happy, full lives without anyone knowing they have the virus.

Unfortunately, cats that have tested positive are overlooked by those looking to adopt. Even though they are healthy and active cats, fear prevents folks from giving them a chance. 

Sadly, there are a lot of myths and misconceptions that surround Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) and the cats that have it.  Hopefully by dispelling these myths, we can encourage folks to consider adopting or fostering a FIV+ cat.

3 Myths about FIV

  • FIV+ cats are highly contagious and they cannot live in a home with FIV- cats. 
  • FIV+ cats are doomed to live short and unhealthy lives. 
  • FIV+ cats aren’t worth the effort, they are just going to spend their entire lives sick.

All three of these statements are absolutely not true. Correct information about FIV and its impact on a cat’s life could put a potential adopter’s fears to rest.

The Truth about FIV

FIV is transferred only by saliva to blood or blood to blood contact.

What that means is sharing a litter box, food bowl, minor scuffles or grooming each other, does not pass FIV from one cat to another.  A significant puncture wound or multiple wounds would have to occur for an infected cat to transfer FIV to an uninfected cat.  This type of fight is pretty rare–almost unheard of– amongst spay/neutered cats living in a home or kennel environment.

Many FIV+ cats live long long healthy lives.

Often, owners only discover their cat has FIV late in life when the cat has developed a secondary infection. Many live 17, 18, 19 years before there is any indication of an immune system compromise.  Because most shelters don’t test for FIV and unless a cat has symptoms of the secondary infections, most people don’t think to test their cats. That means, many FIV cats live long healthy lives amongst non-FIV cats mates.

Keeping FIV+ cats healthy is quite easy.

The way to insure a healthy FIV+ cat stays healthy is to provide routine vet check ups, feed them a quality, premium food and quickly seek medical care if symptoms of infection or illness occur.  So, if your FIV+ cat remains indoors, eats well and is well cared for… your cat and its immune system will stay strong for a very long time. Just like an FIV- cat!

All cats deserve a chance to live full, happy lives.

Cats thrive with the love and companionship that a home provides them. Because FIV does not necessarily mean a short and illness filled life, these cats would benefit from a home environment just like FIV- cats. And we know their adopters would benefit from the love of a special cat or two!

Our FIV+ Cats

At Lange Foundation’s Halfway Home Kennel, we have a spacious area dedicated entirely to our FIV+ cats. They receive the same loving care we give every one of our animals. Come and meet some of our FIV positive cats. All are loving, wonderful, and silly little felines waiting for you take them home!

If you are interested in adopting or fostering one of our FIV+ cats, please let us know! We would love to chat and help you make the right decision.

Veterinarians

Ophthalmology

Orthopedic

Internal Medicine

Cardiology

Dentistry

Neurology

Dermatologist

  • Dr. Kirby
    Animal Dermatology Clinic
    4834 Lincoln Blvd., Marina Del Rey, CA 90292
    (310) 822-3376
    animaldermatology.com

Other Rescues

Millions of pets end up in shelters each year due to minor behavior problems, no i.d. tag, economic problems, death in the family, foreclosure, moving, and divorce. Four million of these homeless animals are killed each year in America’s shelters. Ninty percent of the animals that enter shelters are adoptable or could be with care and treatment. If Lange Foundation doesn’t have your perfect pet, please keep searching at other shelters and rescues.

Feral Cats

You’ll find outdoor cats in most neighborhoods across the country. They may be: strays (lost or abandoned pets), ferals (fearful of people and not suitable as pets), or pets allowed outside by their owners (which we do not recommend – indoor cars are safer). Many times people “rescue” outdoor cats who actually belong to someone. It is important not to rescue a cat unless you are certain they are a stray or if they are in danger. Understanding the complex issues related to outdoor cats will help us to reduce their overpopulation and keep cats and wildlife safer.

The term “feral” is sometimes used to refer to an animal that does not appear friendly when approached by humans, but the term can apply to any domesticated animal without human contact. Hissing and growling are self-defense behaviors.

If you find a feral cat, it’s possible that they belong to a colony. A colony is a group of feral cats that may be fed and cared for by kind people. In that case, the feral cat may not need to be rescued. After spaying/neutering, vets typically tip (clip) the ear of a feral cat before they are re-released. 

 

Lost & Found Pets

Lost an animal?

Make sure your pet has identification tags on it at all times. They should also be microchipped for additional security. All information should be up-to-date.

Put up as many “Lost” posters as you can, in the area your animal was lost and beyond. Dogs especially can travel miles from home. Notify all public and private shelters as well as any veterinary clinics in your area. Your flyers should be clear, concise, and have your contact information. Post ads online. The more people see your information, the better of a chance you have of finding your lost animal.

Found an animal?

Always assume any found animal is lost, not stray. Even if an animal is underweight and dirty, there’s always a chance that they are a beloved pet that has been lost for some time. Check for identification like a tag, tattoo, or microchip. Any vet office should be willing to scan for a microchip for free.

Legally, you should notify your area animal shelter and provide them with a description of the found animal. The shelter can require you turn the animal over to them if you have it with you. Any pet owner looking for their lost pet will most likely check with area shelters first so you should provide a description to the shelter.

A good idea is to post flyers around the area you found the animal. You should also post online on craigslist and other classified ad boards. On flyers and online, you should post a general description of the animal, location, date and time of discovery. When people contact you, they should be able to describe the animal and provide proof of ownership.